To be or not to be… outraged.

30 Day Blog Challenge
It's a day ending in "y" so that means it's a perfect day to be outraged. And outraged, we are. I'm not going to share what we're outraged about because chances are, by the time you read this entry, we'll be outraged about something else entirely. A few weeks ago Whiskey, Wine & Moonshine talked about society's propensity to be outraged about, well, everything. Some folks seem to get up in arms about everything, and others seem unable to muster a flip about anything much. They're on the other end of the outrage continuum, hanging out at the apathy mark.¬†{Insert horrible thing to be outraged about} and we aren't interested in the details. Our heads are buried in the proverbial sand. We just go along with the status quo, because…
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Start with questions.

Education
So there's a picture making the rounds. And although this particular picture and its provocative caption spawned this entry, what follows is applicable to any picture, meme, article, video and so on. In short, any document. Being literate is one thing, but engaging in critical literacy means reading against the grain. Critical literacy starts with questions rather than reactions. It demands¬†research instead of assumptions. To be critically literate means to ask who published a given document and what do they hope to accomplish by doing so? Who benefits and who doesn't? Critical literacy asks for context. Not simply the text, but what comes with it. It requires active engagement over passive acceptance. The picture in question is connected to education. Math, to be specific. And despite the caption and the…
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Dereliction and Fire

Text Talk
I debated the merits of crafting a preamble to this excerpt, and as I begin typing, I honestly haven't decided what to say about it. So we'll see... I read Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Early on in my reading, I became angry. I graduated from a high school named after this man. We did not read his words. At various points, teachers or administrators recited quotes of his, or summarized the "highlights" of his life. Our mascot, school paper and yearbook were all symbolic of him. But we did not read his words. We did not spend time in an English class, nor a history class, nor an extracurricular making sense of his life. Glaring omission seems too quiet, too meek, too gray to…
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