Ask questions

Abolition & Justice, Education, Text Talk
As a graduate student, one of my favorite topics of discussion and research was inquiry. Asking questions, conducting investigations, and building knowledge through exploration are powerful tools for thinking and learning. As I continued in my studies, I learned of critical inquiry, which expands the idea of questioning to include a political or sociocultural lens. Developing conscientização, or critical awareness/awakening, is akin to taking the red pill. You start to ask sociopolitical questions and suddenly  you are hard-pressed to see anything as flat, uncomplicated or devoid of nuance. This isn't a negative thing, but it makes for interesting conversations. I mention all of this to introduce a quote by Angela Davis. I'm currently reading The Meaning of Freedom and Other Difficult Dialogues,  a compilation of speeches she delivered between 1994…
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Today at lunch…

Feminist Thought, Personal Narrative
I mentioned my plans to transition out of K-12 and into reading/writing/teaching about women's issues. I highlighted rape culture and sexual violence and fibroids by name, although my net is cast a bit wider than these. The woman who inquired about my goals made the raised eyebrow/pulled down lips/impressed face and nodded. "Wow. Good for you. What got you moving in that direction?" Who knows? It brings to mind a similar question asked of Angela Davis. In a lecture recorded as The Prison Industrial Complex, she discussed her activist beginnings: "What made you decide to become an activist? What was that pivotal event in your life? And for years and years I thought about it." She went on to mention the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing that killed four little…
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Right outcome, wrong reasons.

Education
A few days ago, I wrote on the multiculturalism of language, and the absolute futility of excluding words from standardized tests because they aren't "neutral enough." Well, it looks as though New York's DOE abandoned the (doomed to fail) effort: One week after New York's Department of Education drew controversy with a request to ban 50 words and references from the city's standardized tests – including “dinosaur,” “birthday” and "religion" – the department announced Tuesday that it is abandoning the plan. I disagree with those who think it is simply political correctness gone too far. That dismisses the larger issue as a problem with "some bureaucrats somewhere" trying too hard to "be nice." The truth is, because of the inherent multiculturalism of life events and the words used to describe those events, someone will…
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The Multiculturalism of Language

Education
Divorce. Dinosaurs, Birthdays. Religion. Halloween. Christmas. Television. These are a few of the 50-plus words and references the New York City Department of Education is hoping to ban from the city’s standardized tests. What interests me about this topic is not the seemingly careful selection of words for inclusion/exclusion. Nay, I'm intrigued that we still hold firm to the belief that language is, can be, or should be, neutral. Maybe someone has identified a few "hot button" words that are potentially "more loaded" than others (debatable), but this idea, that somehow language and word choice is ever truly decontextualized (or even should be) is not just silly, it's dangerous. In this world of high-stakes testing, an ever diversifying population is expected to magically measure up to standardized notions of sameness.…
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The Danger of the Single Story

Personal Narrative
I really appreciate Chimamanda Adichie's TED Talk: The Danger of the Single Story. She reminds us that we are all "vulnerable in the face of a story." The lesson is that we should realize there is always more to the story or that there are other stories not represented in what we assume to be true. We assume we understand a relationship because we've heard all the stories from our friend's point of view. But that collection of stories is still a single story. It is the single view of a given situation (further, only as it is narrated by one person). And that story isn't a permanent one as the situation or the persons in it change over time. The same is true with our own lives. The overarching…
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